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. and later, nsa data collection. >> tomorrow night on the encore presentation of "first ladies" -- >> you would be invited into the dining room for the drawing room. dolly madison would have an unusual setting for the period and sit at the head of the table. her husband would sit at the center of the table. dollywood correct -- direct the conversation -- dolly would correct -- direct the conversation. there could be as many as 20 people served in the dining room. sheuld not be unusual. considered the dining to be more relaxing than entertaining in washington. >> the encore presentation of our series "first ladies." >> when it comes to telephone calls, nobody is listening to your phone calls. that is not what this program is about. as was indicated, what the intelligence community is doing is looking at phone numbers, durations of calls. they are not looking at people's names and they're not looking at content. >> these programs are controversial. we understand that. they are sensitive. they are also important. they allow us to have the ability to gather this chatter that i referred to. if
. neil: should he have been on top of the nsa, or is that too much for mark cuban? >> come on neil. >> you are mr. internet star. >> i don't see it as that big a deal, i know -- i get audited almost every year, all my foundations get audited pretty much every year, most of my businesses. neil: both democratic and republican administrations alike. >> i don't feel like a victim, i still have to compete, with nsa it is disappointing there was not transparency up front they were doing this, and we found out about it the way we did. about, bits are bits, if you think your mailbox was protected and they could not find out what they wantedo. there is not a much privacy as people would like to expect, particularly in an era where i would rather be protected. neil: if you want your privacy get over it, is it that bad? >> it is that good. neil: you hear the other instances like hacking or sites shutting down, and instagram, and nazdaq, so many others, washington post, "new york times," amazon, again and again, you see a pattern. >> yeah, you better believe it, every single digital asset we h
-- >> a promise from the nsa -- germany's top intelligence minister says the u.s. has offered adeal great >> could israel a someone's doom peace talks before they begin? >> and the row between britain and spain over gibraltar is heating up. london is sending out warships area -- warships. >> aagreement between the u.s. and germany -- it could be the latest result of edward snowden's revelations about mass surveillance by the nsa. >> today, the man who oversees intelligence in angela merkel's government says washington offered this deal to try to allay german peoples fears that their text and phone calls are being spied spied on by foreign agency. he appeared for the second time in front of a lawmakers committee. >> it has been dominating the headlines just six weeks before national elections in germany. now the government is hoping this new pledge will neutralize the issue. >> the government's chief of staff was grilled for six hours on the nation -- on the nature of german collaborators with foreign intelligence agencies. he has been assured that neither the u.s. or britain rope protection laws.
: it is not just the nsa giving the creeps, it is the creeps at the irs giving americans a bigger case of the creeps. you are so out of your mind area did next. neil: what is that i keep telling you about the best defense is always an even better offense. belittled and badgered still coming out at it tooth and nail continuing their harassment of tea party groups on invaded. still pestering, still intimidating. still fuming. far from slowing down as you predicted and as you and your colleagues experienced, still unbowed are. >> they have gotten a bit greedy. they did effectively unde undere the efficacy of these groups at the election. the activism was somewhat oppressed by the fact they couldn't deal with the irs, they were afraid. even quoted in the "wall street journal" saying she would go places and there would be empty chairs and everybody questioning whether the tea party was agood label anymore. but this has backfired on the irs because now at the tea party patriots, their donationare tripled, the staff has doubled because people are seeing this not as a conservative versus liber
, their elected governments. as for the allegation that nsa surveillance is bigger than anything in the soviet union, so is the internet which did not exist or most of the soviet union. it was a little bit of intrigue considering how much the communication standards have changed. the fact that we are talking about this they say that is utter nonsense. they crackdown in prison and psychologically drug their descendents. it is any kind of rational debate. >> you might ask what is happening in guantÁnamo bay. that has gone on ever since. you might also ask yourself the question that if britain was so keen on detaining them for the maximum period, why didn't germany do something about it? to end any public discussion about this degree of surveillance. >> i want to bring up one point, as the romans would put it, the law is harsh but it is the law. in this case, it would be the law. breaking the law is ok? these programs constitute massive sweeping systematic invasions and the right to privacy. the active public interests, it is great personal risk. they seem more interested in persecuting mr. snow
the top intelligence agents. they want to know how they aided programs directed at citizens. the nsa affair has been laid to rest. he has given the parliamentary intelligence committee written confirmation that it never broke german law. the nsa does get information from germany, collected by the intelligence agency. it gathers information in many parts of the world. >> the data is almost exclusively data on foreign activities. >> the opposition parties said that they have a duty to protect parties. the u.s. -- they want to know more about how the u.s. software works. >> we still do not know how it works. what privacy rights are being threatened? how much information is the u.s. collecting on german citizens? >> the government says it will continue to ask washington about what is going on and answer the concerns of the german public. the need to regain voters trust. >> inspectors have arrived to investigate claims that they have been used. >> they will spend the next two weeks gathering evidence but stopped short of determining who is responsible for any of the alleged attacks. >> ea
to you. >> about time. thank you very much. >>> let's talk about the nsa. another revelation came out yesterday afternoon and it turns out that they have -- they have released additional information over the past -- since 2008 on things that have gone wrong in the nsa collection. for example, there was a redacted page which is unredacted and classified yesterday that revealed that we have collected 56,000 wholly domestic communications each year. so this is done, nothing was necessarily done with it. nothing was exposed by it. but these were collected and the fisa court judge did not know about it and he rebuked the nsa for doing that and they said they were unintentional errors. >> we have been talking for a while about the nsa, how they're saying trust us, we're not doing anything illegal. the stuff that was declassified yesterday said they didn't break some laws. they violated -- the nsa violated the constitution three times in three years. violated the constitution because they did as brian said go through our e-mails, domestic e-mails, rather than just the foreign stuff. remember
people from benghazi and the nsa and the drone debate and the complete and utter failure of our horrible economy. >> you said all that needs to be said. >> i would just offer on top of that one portuguese water dog, get yourself a yellow lab. right? come on. the other side is the name bo and sunny, these are the names people give dogs when they are not the ones naming them. okay, bo and sunny. if obamas had a sense of humor they would call them achmed and lennon or something like that. no? >> i want to get back to being serious. at a time when americans can't find one job how shameful is it for the president and his family to have two dogs? it is a slap in the face of the american public. >> i am going to say something controversial. i like this dog. i want to pet this dog. >> go to commercial! >> bars and tone! >> i want to give the dog a hug. he has little white boots. sunny, i want to give it a hug and kiss it and pet the dog. i will say it. >> you are like the mayor of san diego. >> i want to get back to something buck was saying. sunny is a portuguese water dog. i guess an american
bugging, the united nations? a new report says america's spy agency, the nsa, targeted u.n. headquarters. in minutes, what the latest allegations against the nsa could mean for washington and our allies. and when you run with the bulls, you want to dodge the horns. but there's another danger lurking in america's newest past time, the drones over the sand. no really, you have to watch out for those, too, apparently. i am harris faulkner. the pope, leader of one billion catholics around the world has spoken about syria. as you know, world governments, including our own, are pondering what to do about the civil war in syria creating millions of refugees, putting pressure on neighboring muslim countries and potentially punching holes in an already fragile imbalance there. it could be the opening for terrorists to capitalize on the chaos in syria. aside from the wrangling by the politicians and diplomats, today, pope francis called for action, urging the international community to step up efforts to help syria end the war. the pope addressed tens of thousands of worshippers in st. peter's squ
nsa contractor, edward snowden, has granted a years asylum in russia. this has strained relations between moscow and russia. president obama is under pressure to retaliate. an upcoming summit is in question. >> this was the moment this afternoon when edward snowden wearing a black rucksack with his back to the camera climbed into a car and disappeared into russia, the biggest country in the world. he had been stuck in limbo in the transit zone of the airport. he insisted he would not go to america to face trial. me aht, his lawyer showed copy of the document that grants him polit asylum in russia for at least a year. he said that he is in a hotel but he would not say where. >> the question of his security is obviously very important. a great powers trying to catch him. the name of the power is the united states of america. >> edward snowden himself said over the past eight weeks, we have seen the obama administration show no respect for international or domestic law but in the end, the law is winning. this evening, however, russia's longest serving dissident pondered whether he kn
next month. voters are angered i the allegations that the nsa targeted the massive spying program and the german government was complicit. the government is fighting back. >> germany's foreign intelligence service, ded, uses its installation in bavaria to survey the world. some of that information is shared with the national security agency from the u.s.. in parliament, a scandal. the social democrats want access. and it is the center-right that says that it was these social democrats who came up with the information sharing all they were in government. >> this agreement is based on a policy decision from the former chancellor and chief of staff. >> under chancellor gerhard schroeder, he was responsible for cord knitting the agencies. today he serves as the chief of a parliamentary group. this is seen as a campaign issue ahead of the general election next month. it cracks -- >> it is total hypocrisy for the spd to be outraged at the cooperation between the nsa and the dd. >> they say that the government is trying to dodge the implications. >> germany is one of the top arms exporte
to that new "the washington post" report concerning the nsa. the report says the nsa broke privacy rules or overstep its legal authority thousands of time each year since 2008. >>> it's not a problem. it worked. if you have 99.9% compliance and so few reporting errors this came from an internal report which then becomes part of an overall ig report. i'm on the intelligence committee. i'm satisfied we're told. >> the problem and there is a real problem with the system. it's a black box, the fisa court is a secret tribunal issuing secret opinions making secret law and a lot of it completely unavailable to members even of the foreign intelligence committee. >> those documents published by the "the washington post" were leaked by edward snowden. >>> this weekend has been a wash out in parts of the south. heavy rains flooded several streets in north carolina and more rain is expected through the weekend. will it end? when is the question. we have more on that. >> we're still keeping an eye on the rain up and down the east coast. it's streaming in off the gulf of mexico and the southeast will
the u.s. nor britain broke german data law. >> according to the n.s.a. and british intelligence agencies, german laws have been observed. the rights of our citizens in germany are being safeguarded. >> both the n.s.a. and british intelligence agencies assured him in writing that their activities had not been irregular. but in the wake of the programs revealed by edward snowden many remained skeptical, none more so than germany's opposition. >> there is no agreement which forbids the americans from using the prism program or instruments to monitor german communications. >> the government considers the affair closed but with the german election race heating up, the subject looks set to stay in the headlines. >> on monday rail passengers at a station faced cancellations as a result of ongoing organizational chaos. more than 40% of services were hit, severely disrupting the morn commute. half of the station's dispatchers are on vacation or sick. the rail operator has faced massive criticism for its handling of the crisis. >> it's not a question of personnel, it's a question of management. th
on the government's surveillance programs-this time it's knock from the nsa leaker ed snowden. instead from the journalist two first published ed snowden's leaks. that journalist is glenn greenwald and he has vowed to release more government secrets after british authorities yesterday detained his partner for nine hours of interrogation. you can see greenwald here with her pastner on the left. it happened at london's heathrow airport. they used anti-terror laws to hold the partner for questionings, seizing his laptop, cell phone, and memory sticks. glenn greenwald said it's intended to keep him from spilling more secrets and in response he said britain will be sorry and, quote, i will be far more aggressive in my reporting from now. i am going to publish many more documents. i am going to publish things on england, too. ed snowden gave the journalist between 15 and 20,000 secret documents, documents that reveal how national security agency keeps tabs on our phone calls and e-mails. i spoke with greenwald last month and asked him about the document that he has not yet released. >> some of th
: it isot just the nsa giving the creeps, it is the creeps at the irs giving americans a bigger case of the creeps. you are so out of your mind area did next. when we made our commitment to the gulf, bp had two big goals: help the gulf recover and learn from what happened so we could be a better, safer energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. 've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, whe experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our coitment has never been stronger. neil: what is that i keep telling you about the best defense is always an even better offense. belittled and badgered still coming out at it tooth and nail continuing their harassment of tea party groups on invaded. still pestering, still intimidating. still fuming. far from slowing down as you predicted and as you and your colleagues experienced, still unbowed are. >> they have gotten a bit greedy. they did effectively unde u
stories based on the national security agency documents leaked by n.s.a. contractor edward snowden vowed today to publish new revelations about britain's espionage system. because british police detained his companion, david miranda, at london's heathrow airport and questioned him for nine hours. greenwald implied he knew many secrets about british intelligence and said authorities would regret detaining his partner. a cbs news correspondent john miller who is a former assistant director of the f.b.i. is on the case for us. john, what do you make of this? >> well, one question was did the brits do this on their own or were they acting on behalf of the united states and the white house acknowledged today that they were given advance word that this stop was going to happen. in another way, bob, it almost doesn't matter. you have to understand the way that u.s. intelligence and british intelligence work together. particularly the n.s.a. and their counterpart in great britain, the g.c.h.q. it's almost seamless. they have a morning conference call. they divide up the tarring hes, they work on
of the so-called black budget which was leaked by the fugitive former n.s.a. computer technician edward snowden. it shows that the budget in its entirety tops $52 billion a year with the biggest share-- more than $14 billion-- going to the c.i.a. our john miller is a former assistant deputy director of national intelligence. john, what did you find in terms of surprises in the budget? >> it was full of tantalizing facts-- some of which i knew because i used to go through this budget. but i think if you're going to pull out the special moments, one, there's the irony which is that the n.s.a. had a budget justification in there to look at 4,000 intelligence officers who they felt might be the insider threat. in other words, a potential security risk who might, i don't know, leak a document like edward snowden. so they certainly seem to have a point there. two, that the n.s.a. and c.i.a. were working on a large program jointly together about offensive cyber attacks against our adversaries since we hear a lot of discussion about cyber attacks against us. and, third, and probably most import
it's used by even nsa. but oracle is an legal battle with google accusing the search giant of using its language without its permission. i sat down with >> you know larry and sergey you have trouble with? >> larry specifically. >> larry -- i think -- >> larry per se. >> larry per se >> why? >> because he makes the decisions over there. he runs that company. no one else runs that company. and they decided -- let me be very clear. when you write a program, you write it. you use the oracle oracle/java tools for everything. up press a button and say convert this to android format. we don't compete with google. we just took our stock. that's a completely separate issue. >> but think they're evil. >> i think what they did was absolutely --. >> and you blame larry page. >> so larry page is evil -- that makes larry page evil? >> no i know his slogan is don't be evil. i think he slipped up this one time. >> he's a good time except for this one time when he -- >> this really bothers me. i don't see how he thinks you can just copy someone else's stuff. >> let's talk about stev
tonight. the reporter that made nsa edward snowden a household name is facing retaliation with government forces targeting his spouse. recently freed after hours of interrogation at the london airport. >>> later, live on the fire lines where the tide may be turning by a race against weather conditions that could breathe new life into an infern toe. >>> a baby killer suspected in the death of dozens of other children might soon walk free and the mother determined to see that she doesn't. we begin with a 360 exclusive involving the alleged misuse of power. not to prosecute potential acts of terror but individuals at the airport. david miranda and his spouse glen green would. they are speaking out for the first time. green wald has been edward snowden's conduet to the world. sunday he was heading home from berlin having met with a documentary film maker who has been working with green wald. while changing planes in london, british athouthorities detained miranda and interrogated him. as you'll hear on 360, miranda claims they didn't ask him about terrorism but threatened him with jail time a
with glenn green wall still at the center of the nsa storm. [ shapiro ] at legalzoom, you can take care of virtually all your important legal matters in just minutes. protect your family... and launch your dreams. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. what are you guys doing? having some fiber! with new phillips' fiber good gummies. they're fruity delicious! just two gummies have 4 grams of fiber! to help support regularity! i want some... [ woman ] hop on over! [ marge ] fiber the fun way, from phillips'. are you flo? yes. is this the thing you gave my husband? well, yeah, yes. the "name your price" tool. you tell us the price you want to pay, and we give you a range of options to choose from. careful, though -- that kind of power can go to your head. that explains a lot. yo, buddy! i got this. gimme one, gimme one, gimme one! the power of the "name your price" tool. only from progressive. glenn green wald, the guardian columnist who helped introduce the world to edward snowden is lashing out at british authorities after his live-in partner was detained in london sunday
, the father of nsa leaker wed ward snowden is speaking out, telling abc news that his son is not a traitor. and though snowden says he believes in the american justice system, he does not think his son would get a fair trial if he returns from russia. abc's susan saulny in washington tonight. >> as a father, i want my son to come home. >> reporter: today, in an exclusive interview with abc's george stephanopoulos, lon snowden, father of fugitive nsa leaker edward snowden, said plans have been made to reunite in russia. >> you're going to moscow? >> reporter: bruce fein is the family's lawyer and says it will happen very soon. >> we have visas, we have a date which we won't disclose right now because of the frenzy. >> reporter: the purpose of the trip? to come up with a criminal defense against charges of espionage. >> what i would like is for this to be vetted in open court for the american people to have all the facts. >> reporter: but the elder snowden is not convinced his son could get a fair trial. >> when you consider many of the statements made by our leaders, they have poisoned the
apparently are supportive of some action at this point, but if you recall, the nsa funding vote, do you remember the justin conners vote a couple weeks ago where they came close to passing a bill that would be taking money away on the nsa surveillance, and it was a phreut on both parties on the bill, and very narrowly it got defeated. that's a way to look at how the vote on syria will go. you will see the republicans and the liberal wing of the democratic party, and the isolationist wing of the republican party, they were on the losing side, but boy did they come close and they got 200 plus votes. >> chuck, it would seem to me that this is not just going to be a vote on military action in syria. this is in a lot of ways going to be a vote on america's role in the world moving forward. no? >> that's right. should america play the world's police officer, right? are we the ones in charge of deciding when an international law is broken, like assad did with the chemical weapons, since there is no other country willing to step up, is this the role of the united states? it's the role the unite
. >>> the fallout from the nsa scandal is growing this morning. the washington reported the agency broke privacy rules thousands of times since 2008. >> "the post" cited an internal audit and other top-secret documents reportedly obtained from former contractor edward snowden. on cbs "face the nation" sunday california congresswoman jackie spear said it revealed what she calls extraordinary misdeeds. >> there is failed oversight now. the fact there's all this active going on that we don't know about. they spoon feed to the intelligence committees of both houses what they want to tell them. for any of us to say that we know what's going on in the nsa i would find very suspect. >> our senior correspondent john miller served in the office of the director of national intelligence. he spoke with the nsa last night. welcome back, john, good morning. >> good to be back. >> good morning. >> is this failed oversight? what kind of oversight is it? >> this is very frustrating for the people of the nsa. because their view on this is that this is successful oversight. they said, you
the surveillance said it was fundamentally different than what they were led to believe as the nsa sweeped up thousands of e-mails from americans with absolutely no ties to terrorism. amid growing controversy comes more revelations the national security agency illegally collected tens of thousands of americans' e-mails. new declassified documents show the nsa collected nearly 60,000 communications a year for three years ending in to 11, it includes e-mails and other internet activity. the court also said the nsa misrepresented the scope of its effort. >> very disturbing, a national security agency has extraordinary surveillance capabilities and these tools are supposed to be directed toward adversaries in the united states, not toward the american public. >> reporter: the nsa says it collected the data by mistake. senior intelligence official telling reporters there was a "technological problem that could not be avoided rather than any overreach." meantime intelligence officials are denying a media report that the nsa sifts through and has access to 75% of online communications in the u.s. th
operatives. this article notes that's one of the main functions of the nsa. so you take a look at the embassy closings, they are officially for sunday but they could be extended, and there could be more closings in number. in fact, yesterday we were talking about a number of 21. that was updated overnight to 22 to include the consulate in b basra. they stretch across north africa and the middle east. peter king, who is a republican congressman, the chairman of the homeland security committee, says there is very little doubt to him something serious is being planned. >> let's talk about -- >> it's the most specific i've seen. i don't think i'm giving anything away when you look at the reaction to have 21 embassies being closed shows how seriously our government is taking it. >> and two u.s. officials say this threat is against not just the u.s. but broaden it out, western targets. in fact, britain and germany have also said they are going to close their embassies in yemen. >> and, emily, i think we had the chiron over peter king and that was actually -- we had it as chris hill. that was to be
whether dependency on the nsa has become too great. >> italy's supreme court upheld a ruling for berlusconi. it could 3 the government into crisis. judges upheld a jail sentence and that's automatically reduced to a year to the law aimed at reducing overcrowding in prison. they recrewed the second part of the sentence, a foof-year ban from public office. >> that are i argued that berlusconi used offshore companies to buy the rights for u.s. movies. they said he lied when declaring how much he paid and avoided about $9 million in taxes. he said in a video message that the fraud he had been convicted of is cleompletely unfounded. he has the second largest party in the ruling government and the ruling could destabilize a shaky coalition. >> the leaders ofity low's baghdad government warned protesters to end their sit-ins. members of morsi's power base in the muslim brotherhood are not backing down and call on reports after friday's prayers and two squares in the capital. they are placing sandbags on roads to the squares to block security forces. some say they will not leave even
obama is cancelling his meeting with russia's president putin over tensions becausest n.s.a. leaker edward snowden. >> john: yes, that is clearly the only reason. it's-- it's always a good idea to pad out with what you really want to say with self-righteous human rights stuff like, "kimberly, we need a break. i don't like your stance on chine and tibetan monks and your boobs are weirding me out." if we want snowden back all we need to do is convince vladimir putin that snowden is gay. that away wayhe'llob a plane into u.s. custody faster than a definitely not homoerotic team of elastic clad men. that quick. actually, russia is not only global leadership story we're dealing with tonight which brins us to our new segment... indeed. now, we've already dealt with russia, so let's see where our magical dploab will take us next egypt! egypt. i just lift egypt. i'm not-- i'm not used to guns. ( laughter ) as the situation in egypt continues to devolve, the u.s. like a polar bear on a hastily melting glackier is trying to act like everything's still cool. ( laughter ) a couple of weeks ago,
, the reporter who made nsa leaker edward snowden a household name says he's facing retaliation by government forces targeting his spouse. >>> later tonight, we're on the fire lines where the tide may be turning but it is a race against weather conditions. >>> also tonight, how a convicted baby killer who is suspected in the deaths of dozens of other kids who might soon walk free. >>> we begin with that exclusive involving alleged misuse of government power. this man, who you see here, in the airport in rio, david miranda and his spouse glenn greenwald. greenwald writes for britain's guardian newspaper and has been edward snowden's conduit to the world. sunday, miranda was heading home from berlin having med with a documentaryian. while he was changing planes in london, british authorities detained him and questioned him for nearly nine hours under britain's anti-terrorism law. he claims they did not ask him a single question about terrorism. they did, however, threaten him with jail time and confiscated his laptop and just a short time ago, i spoke with david miranda and glenn greenwald. dav
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 120 (some duplicates have been removed)